Artists You Should Know: Utaites

Illustration for article titled Artists You Should Know: Utaites

Hello all, this is HydraCord, back from the hiatus known as the dark depths of school. I’m hijacking Ascendant’s normal column today (he let me, don’t worry) to tell you about one of the more popular people in Japan: Utaites. Now, here’s the primary question:

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Who are Utaites?

Let me just get this clear. Utaites are not a single band, or a single singer, or a musical studio. Rather, utaites are people who cover mainly Vocaloid and sometimes anime songs. Some utaites also go on to write their own songs and lyrics for both Vocaloids and the human voice alike. Typically, they post their singing behind the official lyric video, syncing them up to near perfection, which then goes on Niconico and sometimes even YouTube. They also commission anime-like artwork of themselves (one is even a brown-haired Tomoe), which results in lots of fanart.

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Due to the fact that the songs commonly covered by utaites are often incredibly electronic, they are skilled at autotuning their voice to make it fit the song.

Utaites also have a huge variety of voices due to various styles of music developing. They can range from deep to incredibly high, and also range to feminine-sounding boys, shota-like girls, screamers, and even rappers.

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Wow, those sound pretty cool! Where can I find them?

Well, thank you, omniscient-sounding article! Almost all utaites can be found on NND and YouTube, just by searching up their channel! I will post a small sampling of utaites on this article now, actually.

There’s kradness, one of the most popular utaites out there, with his cover of Senbonzakura by Hatsune Miku. His voice is classified as incredibly intense and high-pitched, to the point of almost sounding feminine.

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YouTube:

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(I’m not going to post NND channel links because I don’t know NND very well)

There’s reol, an utaite turned songwriter singing her original song, LUVORATORRRRRY! (yes, that is the actual name) featuring nqrse (I’m going to talk about him more later). Her voice is typically classified as shota.

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YouTube:

There’s nqrse, a rapper who sometimes adapts songs to fit his style as seen in the rap version of Happy Halloween. And yes, the singing voice and the rapping voice are both the same person. Pretty insane how someone can alter their voice, right?

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YouTube:

Finally, there’s 96neko, a reverse trap singer who is mistaken for a guy almost all the time (I mean, look at how deep her voice is! GOD). Here’s her cover of E, A Sou by Hatsune Miku.

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She doesn’t have a YouTube, and I can’t navigate NND very well.

Another utaite-related genre of videos is the NicoNico Chorus genre, where a person from NND creates a mashup of songs from several utaites and puts them together into one song, like this cover of The Lost One’s Weeping. The utaites mashed up in this are Dasoku, Yorukichi, nigaihito, Taiyakiya, Kogeinu, Mafumafu, Kusarina, Himeringo, Owan, and Mirin.

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There are still legions of utaites out there that I’m leaving you to find on your own; these are not the only ones. I hope that I had taught you something today, and I also hope that you enjoyed the show! Thank you for reading!

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